Campuses Will Become Increasingly Diverse, Report Says

Campuses Will Become Increasingly Diverse, Report Says

                                                            The Chronicle of Higher Education

By ERIK LORDS

 

College campuses will become increasingly diverse as the 21st century unfolds, according to a new study by the Educational

Testing Service.

 

Over the next 15 years, enrollment at American colleges will increase by 19 percent, to 16 million, and minority students will

account for 80 percent of that growth, a report on the study said.

 

The report projects that the proportion of students who are black will rise from 12.8 percent to 13.2 percent by 2015, and that the proportion who are Hispanic will increase from 10 percent to about 15 percent. The proportion who are Asian is expected to rise from 5.4 percent to 8.4 percent. The percentage of students who are white will decline to about 62 percent, even though the total number of white students will rise modestly.

 

Much of the growth is attributed to a rise in births and to a belief among many minority families that a college degree is the key

to having a prosperous life.

 

Accommodating those increases is "about to become an even more core issue than it was when the baby boomers went

through college," said Anthony P. Carnevale, a vice president at the testing service. He and Richard A. Fry, a senior economist

at E.T.S., wrote the report, titled "Crossing the Great Divide: Can We Achieve Equity When Generation Y Goes to College?"

 

"It's not just going to college because you're middle class anymore," Mr. Carnevale says. "Now it's about people going so they

will be able to get a job."

 

Researchers arrived at their figures using Census Bureau projections on population growth, and assessment tests given to

elementary-school children that indicate whether they're likely to go on to college.

 

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